thelegalizeddeafies:

glitter—skull:

Black ASL - Extremely interesting video talking about how black ASL is similar to AAVE (African American Vernacular English). And I’m just like…ummmm, hell yes! Finally I can learn how to sign the same way I speak. 

oooh, fun fact: did you know, before the civil rights movement, even the deaf schools were segregated? so black and white deaf children were not allowed to interact with each other, and that basically started black ASL. (interessssttiiiinggggg!!!!)

anyways, i’ve had a really bad day, and this just made me a bit too excited.

amyleona:

Seriously, if you have forty minutes, you should watch this. It’s the story of The Wizard of Oz in American Sign Language. (dubbed in English and with English captions)

The Wizard of Oz in American Sign Language was made by Eyes Alive!, an elementary school performing arts group at the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind. The movie was shot over a couple of months on the school campus.

(via thelegalizeddeafies)

carodoodles:

This two-part comic is dedicated to all deaf people who are victims of deadly ignorance on hearing people’s part. Deaf people had been constantly being discriminated, beaten up, erroneously arrested, harmed, and even killed. They are victim of ignorance on hearing people’s part; varied hearing people, ranging from a hearing gang member to a hearing cop. 

There is a dire need to educate the public more about deaf people. Especially those who are cops, hospital workers, firefighters, and many more professions that are involved in critical life or death decisions. 

This comic is dedicated, as well, to those who worked tirelessly to educate the public about deaf people. We need to thank them more. We need to support them more. They do truly make a huge difference in lives of deaf people; a difference that can be a matter of life or death. 

If you would like to read more articles about mistreatment of deaf people by the police, please do take time to visit this website (that’s run by Deafweekly.com)
http://pleasedontshootus.wordpress.com/


Incidences in my comics are based on these news articles:

Articles about cops killing deaf citizens:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2065629/Police-killed-deaf-cyclist-stun-gun-failed-obey-instructions-stop.html

http://www.policeone.com/police-products/firearms/articles/3085468-Video-Cop-shoots-deaf-knife-holding-woodcarver/


Articles about how someone mistook ASL as a gang sign:

http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/01/15/deaf-man-stabbed-after-sign-language-mistaken-for-gang-signs-2/

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504083_162-20058920-504083.html

(via thelegalizeddeafies)

Anonymous asked: I wanted to write a story of a friendship between a deaf and a hearing child (still planning but I wanted to collect info) and I was wondering if you had any tips on showing the conversations? I'm 13 and I wanted to take this on as a summer challenge and maybe get a decent story out of it, but I wanted it to be accurate... Also for a teenager in Michigan where could I find any classes to learn ASL? I've had my heart set on learning for over two years now.

As to the story, I can’t talk too much about it since I am hearing and cannot describe how a deaf adult would feel communicating to a hearing child. 

The best suggestion I can make is to do a lot of research, talk to some of the amazing deaf bloggers here on Tumblr, and also reach out to the deaf community in your area. Actually talk to some deaf adults and ask them the questions you have. Sounds like a great project!

As to your sign language classes… here are a few things the magical internet has helped me gather:

http://www.stjohnprovidence.org/Holley/ASL/

http://www.signlanguageservicesofmichigan.com/classesworkshops.html

http://www.signlanguageservicesofmichigan.com/americansignclass.html

http://moonbythesea.hubpages.com/hub/American-Sign-Language-Classes-in-Michigan

I hope this helps!

thepoliticalfreakshow:

What Police Did To The Deaf Man Pictured Above Is Unbelievable [TW: Ableism, Police Brutality, Graphic Content]

Police officers in Southern California are under fire for allegations that they beat, shocked and arrested a deaf man who was trying to use sign language to communicate with them.
Jonathan Meister, a deaf and non-verbal resident of Manhattan Beach, Calif., claims that the Hawthorne Police Department discriminated against him when they ignored his American Sign Language communication during a Feb. 2013 encounter, which eventually led to a violent confrontation and Meister’s arrest.
Meister, along with the Greater Los Angeles Agency On Deafness (GLAD), filed suit against the City of Hawthorne and the Hawthorne Police department Feb. 12 over the alleged excessive force that left him with bruises and burns all over his body. Meister is suing for unnamed damages, and also wants to compel the police department to better train their officers on how to communicate with a person who is deaf or hard of hearing.
The complaint, filed in U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, contains a harrowing account of what happened on the night in question. According to the complaint, Meister was retrieving his personal belongings from the back porch of a home from which he had just moved when he was approached by two police officers who had been alerted by neighbors about “suspicious” activity.
Meister began signing from the home’s backyard, and the officers gestured for him to join them on the other side of the fence. Meister “trusted” that the officers could see he was deaf and began walking toward them, signing to tell them about how he had permission to retrieve his own belongings from a friends’ house, says the suit. But as soon as Meister was at an arms’ length, the officers grabbed Meister’s wrists and spun him around to face the other way. Because arms, hands and facial expression are the primary means of communication in American Sign Language, Meister then pulled his hands away from the officers and hopped back over the fence, to give himself another chance to explain what he was doing at the home. That’s when things got violent.
The suit claims that police pushed Meister up against the wall, put him in a choke hold and then kneed him twice in the abdomen. One officer then punched him in the face repeatedly, while another officer shot Meister with Taser darts. Once he was on the ground, says the suit, officers kicked and elbowed Meister repeatedly while another officer shocked him a second time with the Taser. After a second choke hold and third Taser shock, Meister was finally unconscious and officers handcuffed and arrested him.
Although the Hawthorne PD initially arrested Meister for assaulting police officers, the charges were eventually dismissed.
The Hawthorne Police Department issued a statement Tuesday claiming that officers are already well-trained on how to overcome communication barriers with people who speak different languages, cannot see or cannot hear. They also maintain that Meister’s arrest was not a case of police officers “mishandling a deaf individual.” Instead, the statement reads, the violent arrest has everything to do with a “205 pound, ex-collegiate Rugby player… willfully and physically resisting and fighting uniformed Hawthorne Police Officers.” From the statement:

Officers make every effort to communicate effectively and bring every one of these incidents to the most peaceful resolution feasible. In almost all cases though, it is the contacted person’s behavior and actions which dictate police response -– not necessarily communication barriers. That is certainly the case in this specific matter. This was not a case of Police Officers not accurately assessing or mishandling a deaf individual. This was a case of Meister, a 31-year-old, 6’-03” / 205 pound, ex-collegiate Rugby player, with accompanying physical skill sets, willfully and physically resisting and fighting uniformed Hawthorne Police Officers conducting a felony investigation, which he was the suspect of and no verification of his innocence had been achieved.




Meister’s lawsuit was first reported by Los Angeles TV station KCAL9. Anna Rivera, Meister’s lawyer, told KCAL9 it is a civil rights case about officers discriminating against a person with a disability. What officers should have done, contends Rivera, is attempt to communicate with a pen and paper. Watch the KCAL9 video below for an interview with Rivera.

thepoliticalfreakshow:

What Police Did To The Deaf Man Pictured Above Is Unbelievable [TW: Ableism, Police Brutality, Graphic Content]

Police officers in Southern California are under fire for allegations that they beat, shocked and arrested a deaf man who was trying to use sign language to communicate with them.

Jonathan Meister, a deaf and non-verbal resident of Manhattan Beach, Calif., claims that the Hawthorne Police Department discriminated against him when they ignored his American Sign Language communication during a Feb. 2013 encounter, which eventually led to a violent confrontation and Meister’s arrest.

Meister, along with the Greater Los Angeles Agency On Deafness (GLAD), filed suit against the City of Hawthorne and the Hawthorne Police department Feb. 12 over the alleged excessive force that left him with bruises and burns all over his body. Meister is suing for unnamed damages, and also wants to compel the police department to better train their officers on how to communicate with a person who is deaf or hard of hearing.

The complaint, filed in U.S. District Court for the Central District of California, contains a harrowing account of what happened on the night in question. According to the complaint, Meister was retrieving his personal belongings from the back porch of a home from which he had just moved when he was approached by two police officers who had been alerted by neighbors about “suspicious” activity.

Meister began signing from the home’s backyard, and the officers gestured for him to join them on the other side of the fence. Meister “trusted” that the officers could see he was deaf and began walking toward them, signing to tell them about how he had permission to retrieve his own belongings from a friends’ house, says the suit. But as soon as Meister was at an arms’ length, the officers grabbed Meister’s wrists and spun him around to face the other way. Because arms, hands and facial expression are the primary means of communication in American Sign Language, Meister then pulled his hands away from the officers and hopped back over the fence, to give himself another chance to explain what he was doing at the home. That’s when things got violent.

The suit claims that police pushed Meister up against the wall, put him in a choke hold and then kneed him twice in the abdomen. One officer then punched him in the face repeatedly, while another officer shot Meister with Taser darts. Once he was on the ground, says the suit, officers kicked and elbowed Meister repeatedly while another officer shocked him a second time with the Taser. After a second choke hold and third Taser shock, Meister was finally unconscious and officers handcuffed and arrested him.

Although the Hawthorne PD initially arrested Meister for assaulting police officers, the charges were eventually dismissed.

The Hawthorne Police Department issued a statement Tuesday claiming that officers are already well-trained on how to overcome communication barriers with people who speak different languages, cannot see or cannot hear. They also maintain that Meister’s arrest was not a case of police officers “mishandling a deaf individual.” Instead, the statement reads, the violent arrest has everything to do with a “205 pound, ex-collegiate Rugby player… willfully and physically resisting and fighting uniformed Hawthorne Police Officers.” From the statement:

Officers make every effort to communicate effectively and bring every one of these incidents to the most peaceful resolution feasible. In almost all cases though, it is the contacted person’s behavior and actions which dictate police response -– not necessarily communication barriers. That is certainly the case in this specific matter. This was not a case of Police Officers not accurately assessing or mishandling a deaf individual. This was a case of Meister, a 31-year-old, 6’-03” / 205 pound, ex-collegiate Rugby player, with accompanying physical skill sets, willfully and physically resisting and fighting uniformed Hawthorne Police Officers conducting a felony investigation, which he was the suspect of and no verification of his innocence had been achieved.

Meister’s lawsuit was first reported by Los Angeles TV station KCAL9. Anna Rivera, Meister’s lawyer, told KCAL9 it is a civil rights case about officers discriminating against a person with a disability. What officers should have done, contends Rivera, is attempt to communicate with a pen and paper. Watch the KCAL9 video below for an interview with Rivera.

(via fuckyeahasl)